submitted:

"Why is it acceptable to say the many other small inconspicuous carved jade idols but not *the carved other inconspicuous many jade small idols?”

From Big brown dog or brown big dog? An electrophysiological study of semantic constraints on prenominal adjective order. D. Kemmerer et al. Brain and Language 100 (2007) 238–256.

literaryreference submitted: 

Psychology of Language: From Data to Theory, 4th ed.

 submitted: 

Psychology of Language: From Data to Theory, 4th ed.

kristinasg submitted:

Evans, G. (1980). Pronouns. Linguistic inquiry, 337-362.

 submitted:

Evans, G. (1980). Pronouns. Linguistic inquiry, 337-362.

 submitted:

So one of my Linguistics courses is a typology survey class that discusses how certain features, like passives, are employed in various languages. Because of the volume of example sentences we get, some of them are bound to be silly. Here’s one of my favorites from Kayardild:

ngada ra-yii-ju mun-da balarr-ina maku-na

‘I will be injected in the buttocks by the white woman.’

(Potential source: Kayardild Morphology and Syntax by Erich R. Round)

if anyone can verify the source, as always, much appreciated. 

'Maori' by Winifred Bauer - A sinister horror story

 submitted:

(2285) E maumahara ana au ki te puta.nga ohorere.tanga mai o taua tangata i te kuuaha.
"I remember that man appearing suddenly in the doorway."

(2286) Ko te tikanga teenei o tana hakirara.tanga i a ia.
"This is the manner of his insulting her."

(2287) Te oho.nga ake o Maaui i te awatea kua ngaro kee toona whaea.
"When Maui woke up at daybreak, his mother had gone."

Eleanor Glewwe (via email) submitted:

This isn’t a sample sentence, but someone suggested I submit it to you:

"[A] phoneme is more like Miley Stewart/Hannah Montana: high school student by day, pop star by night. […] Again, the analogy is not perfect, but you might say that the complex character encompassing both Hannah and Miley is the phoneme. Hannah is one allophone of that character; Miley is another."

Zsiga, E. C. (2012). The sounds of language: An Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology. John Wiley & Sons.

kristinasg submitted:

Pollock, J. Y. (1989). Verb movement, universal grammar, and the structure of IP. Linguistic inquiry, 365-424.

 submitted:

Pollock, J. Y. (1989). Verb movement, universal grammar, and the structure of IP. Linguistic inquiry, 365-424.

conquerorwurm:

dizzydennis:

The passiveness of this sentence makes me laugh every time I see it.There goes Godzilla, destroying the city.

conquerorwurm:

dizzydennis:

The passiveness of this sentence makes me laugh every time I see it.

There goes Godzilla, destroying the city.

(via 221cumberbum)

velartril submitted:

taken together the English glosses on my Klamath complementation homework from Functional Syntax this week form a very disturbing little poem

'I saw him.'
​’He saw me.’
​’Then he sang.’
​’I tried to sing.’
​’He can’t sing.’
​’I can’t see.’
​’I heard him singing.’
​’He will hear me singing.’

'I don't want to tell that'
​’I want to tell that.’
​’They ground wokas.’
​’They finished grinding.’
​’You told me to grind wokas.’
​’You saw me grind wokas.’
‘I want to grind wokas.’
​’You forbade me to go.’
​’I guessed they would come.’
​’[She] looked in to see whether the soup was ready.’
​’He looked for it.’
​’I sent him to look for it.’
​’I ordered him to look for it.’
​’He is blind.’
​’[He] didn’t want them to know that he was blind.’

​’And [she] thought they ate a lot.’

(emphasis added where it seemed appropriate)

A collection of the silliest and/or worst sample sentences we find in linguistics texts.

view archive



Ask!

Submit your own!