Izzy (via email) submitted:

Rose and King 2007, Speech error elicitation and co-occurrence restrictions in two Ethiopian Semitic languages. Language and Speech 50:456.

Izzy (via email) submitted:

Rose and King 2007, Speech error elicitation and co-occurrence restrictions in two Ethiopian Semitic languages. Language and Speech 50:456.

emily (via email) submitted:

Maybe not strictly speaking example sentences, but these are certainly worth sharing. Wikipedia has guidelines on the pluralization of dinosaur names, which it demonstrates with examples:

It may sound strange, but “Sarah is attacked by six Troodon and four Dromaeosaurus.” is the correct way to pluralize generic names. However, “John watched as the group of stegosauri walked by.” is also correct if referring to a group of one genus. The same applies to pluralising binomial names: “John was stampeded by a large herd of Yunnanosaurus huangi and five Yunnanosaurus robustus" or "Katie was assaulted at twilight by a group of Velociraptor mongoliensis and three Pyroraptor olympius.”.

cremedelacremealafu submitted: 

"It would not impress any psychologist, and it would definitely horrify an anthropologist, but who else but an experimental linguist could present such stimuli?"
Hyman, L.M. 2007.  Elicitation as Experimental Phonology - Thlantlang Lai Tonology. In Experimental Approaches to Phonology.

 submitted: 

"It would not impress any psychologist, and it would definitely horrify an anthropologist, but who else but an experimental linguist could present such stimuli?"

Hyman, L.M. 2007.  Elicitation as Experimental Phonology - Thlantlang Lai Tonology. In Experimental Approaches to Phonology.

 submitted:

A Kinnauri sentence from an Applied Grammar Analysis class:

Dʒu          muluk  o     raksa  to:-ts             a

DEM.SG  world   P     ghost  INDIR-PR     QPART

"Are there ghosts in this world?"

Emily (via email) submitted:

Fabio strangled Prince Jamal.

From Wikipedia’s page on the Projection Principle

wugsandhugs submitted:

Adger, David. Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. Oxford University Press, 2003. p. 17.

 submitted:

Adger, David. Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. Oxford University Press, 2003. p. 17.

Cat (via email) submitted:

And the point of pronouns is that they let you keep talking about stuff without repeating names or descriptions every single time, because that gets tedious.

Let’s compare:

Gretchen: Hey Nicole, does Nicole think that Benadryl Cucumber has seen that article Gretchen wrote about Bandersnatch Cumberbund?

Nicole: Nicole doubts that this happy but also terrifying event is likely to have occurred.

vs.

Gretchen: Hey, do you think Bandicoot Cragglerock has seen that article I wrote about him?

Nicole: I doubt it.

See? Much shorter.

source: A Linguist On the Story of Gendered Pronouns

crime-and-puns submitted:

Not an example sentence, but a very unique analogy.
Hornstein et al. (2005.) Understanding Minimalism. Cambridge University Press.

 submitted:

Not an example sentence, but a very unique analogy.

Hornstein et al. (2005.) Understanding Minimalism. Cambridge University Press.

prototumblinguist:

bwayfan25:

My linguistics textbook is correcting grammar errors with a Star Trek reference.

I think you might have missed the point.It’s not “correcting grammar errors.” It’s explaining why they /aren’t/ errors.

prototumblinguist:

bwayfan25:

My linguistics textbook is correcting grammar errors with a Star Trek reference.

I think you might have missed the point.
It’s not “correcting grammar errors.”
It’s explaining why they /aren’t/ errors.

 submitted:

"Why is it acceptable to say the many other small inconspicuous carved jade idols but not *the carved other inconspicuous many jade small idols?”

From Big brown dog or brown big dog? An electrophysiological study of semantic constraints on prenominal adjective order. D. Kemmerer et al. Brain and Language 100 (2007) 238–256.

A collection of the silliest and/or worst sample sentences we find in linguistics texts.

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