velartril submitted:

taken together the English glosses on my Klamath complementation homework from Functional Syntax this week form a very disturbing little poem

'I saw him.'
​’He saw me.’
​’Then he sang.’
​’I tried to sing.’
​’He can’t sing.’
​’I can’t see.’
​’I heard him singing.’
​’He will hear me singing.’

'I don't want to tell that'
​’I want to tell that.’
​’They ground wokas.’
​’They finished grinding.’
​’You told me to grind wokas.’
​’You saw me grind wokas.’
‘I want to grind wokas.’
​’You forbade me to go.’
​’I guessed they would come.’
​’[She] looked in to see whether the soup was ready.’
​’He looked for it.’
​’I sent him to look for it.’
​’I ordered him to look for it.’
​’He is blind.’
​’[He] didn’t want them to know that he was blind.’

​’And [she] thought they ate a lot.’

(emphasis added where it seemed appropriate)

thatsemesteriatemyweightincheese submitted:

1. Max had a great evening last night.2. He had a great meal.3. He ate salmon.4. He devoured lots of cheese.5. He then won a dancing competition. 
- Language in Use - pragmatics/discourse analysis, Carnegie Mellon University

thatsemesteriatemyweightincheese submitted:

1. Max had a great evening last night.
2. He had a great meal.
3. He ate salmon.
4. He devoured lots of cheese.
5. He then won a dancing competition. 

- Language in Use - pragmatics/discourse analysis, Carnegie Mellon University

lesserjoke:

lesserjoke:

I can’t decide which chapter title in this book excites me more: “Multimodal Creativity and Identities of Expertise in the Digital Ecology of a World of Warcraft Guild” or “Ride Hard, Live Forever: Translocal Identities in an Online Community of Extreme Sports Christians.”

Honorable mention goes to “When Friends Who Talk Together Stalk Together: Online Gossip as Metacommunication.”

ModE only has three cases, the nominative, the possessive, and the objective. The objective is only expressed in the dative and accusative uses of personal pronouns (e.g. he → to him, she → to her, I → to me), and the possessive is either expressed with (1) special personal pronouns (e.g. my comic book collection, his mortician), (2) the enclitic ‘s (e.g. the woman’s ammunition, John’s battle axe), or (3) a special structure with ‘of’ (e.g. an act of God, the sound of a garbage bag hitting concrete). Thus, case has largely fallen out of the morphology of nouns, and isn’t seen in demonstratives (e.g. that country’s debt, the stench of those hamburgers; ungrammatical with personal pronoun possessives: *that his mortician, *his that mortician).
how i had fun with papers for a course i took last year by using weird examples (via wugs)
Emily (via email) submitted:

(A collection of sentences from the infamous Generative Semanticists of the 70s.)

Generative Semantics: Secret Handshakes, Anarchy Notes, and the Implosion of Ethos
R. Allen Harris
Rhetoric Review , Vol. 12, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993) , pp. 125-159
Emily (via email) submitted:
(A collection of sentences from the infamous Generative Semanticists of the 70s.)
Generative Semantics: Secret Handshakes, Anarchy Notes, and the Implosion of Ethos
R. Allen Harris
Rhetoric Review , Vol. 12, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993) , pp. 125-159
Emily (via email) submitted:

George Lakoff, Presupposition and relative well-formedness.


#a linguist’s pet amoeba

Emily (via email) submitted:

George Lakoff, Presupposition and relative well-formedness.

#a linguist’s pet amoeba

Emily (via email) submitted:

James D. McCawley, "Where do noun phrases come from?"

Emily (via email) submitted:

James D. McCawley, "Where do noun phrases come from?"

Emily (via email) submitted:

Ray Jackendoff, Patterns in the Mind

Emily (via email) submitted:

Ray Jackendoff, Patterns in the Mind

emily (via email) submitted:

Andrew Carnie, The Syntax Workbook: A Companion to Carnie’s Syntax
Another lovely set of examples from the always entertaining Andrew Carnie. 

emily (via email) submitted:

Andrew Carnie, The Syntax Workbook: A Companion to Carnie’s Syntax

Another lovely set of examples from the always entertaining Andrew Carnie. 

syntactician submitted:

From Sadock & Zwicky (1985), ‘Speech act distinctions in syntax’, in T. Shopen (ed.) Language typology and syntactic description Vol.1: Clause types. CUP. 

syntactician submitted:

From Sadock & Zwicky (1985), ‘Speech act distinctions in syntax’, in T. Shopen (ed.) Language typology and syntactic description Vol.1: Clause types. CUP. 

A collection of the silliest and/or worst sample sentences we find in linguistics texts.

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